C.Tabobandung











1.)  Aboriginal Resource List 

2.) Aboriginal Organization Guide 2011/2012

http://www.gov.bc.ca/arr/services/down/guidetoservices_2011.pdf 

3.) Native Science Primer (Resource for Science Teachers)

Native Science Primer 

4.)  Bill’s Aboriginal Links: Canada and U.S.

http://www.bloorstreet.com/300block/aborcan.htm

*Note: If you have any questions please feel free to ask, there isn’t a question that I haven’t heard 1,000 times before, which most likely means it also won’t offend me.  Or, if you agree or like the things I’ve mentioned and would like to have me in to talk to your Organization or Company please feel free to contact me at ctabobandung@gmail.com

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1.)     Aboriginal/First Nations people DON’T pay taxes.

This is NOT TRUE! All Aboriginal/First Nations people who do not live on a Reserve (land set aside for Aboriginal/First Nations people), are required to pay taxes.  Only time Aboriginal/First Nations people DO NOT pay taxes are when purchases are made on the Reserve (IndianLand).

 2.)    All Aboriginal/First Nations people are the same.

AcrossCanadathere are many different groups of Aboriginal/First Nations people. There are currently over 630 recognized (this does not include ones that are not recognized) First Nations governments or bands spread acrossCanada. Roughly, the total population is nearly 700,000 (this is just an estimate) Aboriginal/First Nations people.

 3.)    What’s the difference between a ‘BAND’ and a ‘RESERVATION’?

‘Band’ is the Government of Indian and Northern Affairs designation for a Nation/Group of Aboriginal/First Nation people who live on a Reserve. That has a governing system which has been delegated by the Government of Canada.

 ‘Reservation’ is the land in which Aboriginal/First Nations people reside on, that the Government of Canada opposed upon Aboriginal/First Nations people, through the ‘Indian Act’.

 4.)     Isn’t ‘BAND’ and ‘TRIBE’ the same thing?

NO, Band and Tribe is not the same thing.

‘Band’ is the Government of Indian and Northern Affairs designation for a Nation/Group of Aboriginal/First Nation people who live on a Reserve. That has a governing system which has been delegated by the Government of Canada.

‘Tribe’ is the specific group or Nation that an Aboriginal/First Nations person belongs to.

 5.)      All Aboriginal/First Nations people do is whine and complain, want everything for free or just handed to them without ever having to work for it!

This is also, NOT TRUE! Aboriginal/First Nations people’s Claims, Title and Rights were specified in The Royal Proclamation of 1763, which is protected in section 25 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The proclamation forms the basis of land claims of aboriginal peoples in Canada – First Nations, Inuit, and Métis.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Proclamation_of_1763 This article stipulates that the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms recognizes the aboriginal people by the Royal Proclamation.

 *Note: If you have any questions please feel free to ask, there isn’t a question that I haven’t heard 1,000 times before, which most likely means it also won’t offend me.  Or, if you agree or like the things I’ve mentioned and would like to have me in to talk to your Organization or Company please feel free to contact me at ctabobandung@gmail.com



http://www.interior-news.com/news/131425393.html

What I like about this article and agree with, is the fact that the school incorporates aspects of Aboriginal history and way of life, such as: “all grade 4 students from across the Bulkley Valley school district are taught a unit on Wet’suwe’ten cultures”, “grade 7 students learn the history of residential schools and their impacts”, “establish closeness with the families and students”.

When we as Aboriginal people talk about a need for Aboriginal Education within the mainstream education system and curriculum, we’re not just talking about the Aboriginal cultural and tradition. We’re talking about the true history of Residential Schools, the truth of how Aboriginal people served in War to defend Canada, the history of the Indian Act. But most of all, how Aboriginal people, since Canada’s birth have worked cooperatively throughout history to help create Canada what it is today. Aboriginal people across Canada need the Recognition and Positive acknowledgment.

Due to the impacts of Residential School’s we have a large population of Aboriginal people who have an innate fear of the education system.  First and second generation families are hugely impacted. This has established the lack of participation and trust in schools today. Today we have Aboriginal families coping with the impacts of being torn apart by Residential Schools, along with being forced into an educational institution expected to be successful within the school system upon re-locating to the city.

Many Aboriginal families come from remote communities that are small and close-knit, where everyone is related and many of the children are monitored by extended family.  When these families have to re-locate to urban areas for whatever reason, this need and desire for the connectedness does not just disappear.  Most Aboriginal families find that living in the city divides people, is based on individualism and separation.  This mentality of thinking within our societies cannot continue.

Our responsibility as the educated; educators, policy and curriculum developers, community service providers, and school board trustees to work cooperatively together to ensure the success of Aboriginal students within the education system. I find that this article speaks to how this one community has developed strategies to overcome these barriers. And also, acknowledges how these strategies work for all students, thus, no more exclusive programming within schools just for Aboriginal students.



Its fall 2008, I jump on UBC 99 express bus to head to my Ethnic Relations class. It is the week of my 30 birthday and my last semester of University and because of that I found myself pondering many different things in regards to myself: life, where I was, and where I wanted to be.  In class, I sat listening and observing as they discussed the relations between ethnic groups and of the interplay between ethnicity and other social factors.

It was because of this class I quickly learned to understand some of my own questions I had about race and ethnicity. During class the professor asked the class, “How many you can tell me what your ethnic background is?” Out of approximately 17-21 students I was the only student that was able to distinguish my many ethnicities as a First Nations person.

After this exercise I had come to my own conclusion that the society we live in and the government upon which governs us, keeps us in racial and ethnic groups to better benefit the majority ruling government currently in place.  Because, the majority is considered to be European, but truthfully, if we were to break Europeans down into ethnic groups, would they end up being the minority group?

The next day I was sitting in my First Nations Studies class where I learned that not many students had the opportunity to learn about First Nations people in the mainstream education system. Many of the non-Native students had said that they couldn’t really remember learning about First Nations people after the history of the Fur Trade, or what they do re-call being taught in elementary and secondary school was only about 3 major groups of First Nations people.  Here on the West Coast it is the Haida, Nishga, and Coast Salish and on the East Coast it is the Mohawk, Ojibway, and Cree.

Most of the students of non-Native background stated that it was pretty sad that they had to wait until University to learn the real truth about the history of First Nations people.  This is why I majored in First Nations Studies.  When I tell people what I majored in, they ask “So what can you do with a Degree in First Nations Studies”, “What is a Degree in First Nations Studies?” or “What do you plan on doing after University?”

Starting University I had no idea what I wanted to do. During University I gain somewhat of an idea. But I would have to say that it was an accumulation of my life and educational experiences in the end that helped to discover my true calling and absolute passion in life. To Facilitate and Advocate for First Nations Education, Cultural Awareness and Sensitivity training.  

I would like to work with, assist and encourage all parties within the Education system, right from daycares, pre-school, elementary and secondary to be more culturally sensitive in regards to First Nations people. It is important for people to recognize how cultural backgrounds affect individual perceptions and actions; and how cultural awareness can improve the relationship between people from differing cultural backgrounds.



et cetera